Pollinators

Monarch Butterflies: The Pollinator We Love

Monarch Butterflies Pollinators

Blazing orange-red wings, deep black veins, bright white polka dots – the distinctive colors of the North American monarch butterfly are instantly recognizable, as monarchs are one of the most well-known and beloved insects in the country. In schools, children study their incredible metamorphosis from caterpillar to butterfly. And in communities across the US, researchers, …

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What Plants Do Pollinators Love?

What Plants Do Pollinators Love?

Butterflies, bees, moths, and other insects, in addition to animal pollinators like bats and birds, are essential for pollinating flowers and plants. These pollinating species transport pollen from flower to flower, encouraging fertilization and thereby producing fruits and seeds. But to reap the greatest benefit from these pollinators, you’ll want to make sure to carefully …

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What Pollinators Work on Your Farm?

Hummingbird wild flower pollinator

If it weren’t for pollinators, the agricultural industry would collapse as we know it. Eighty percent of the world’s food and plant products require pollination, making agricultural crop pollination worth over $3 trillion dollars globally. Pollinating insects, birds, and mammals are critical for crop production, with over 150 crops in the US alone dependent on …

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Three Ways to Get Wildflowers to Pollinate Your Land

Bee flying to wildflower

Pollination is important to all the world’s seed plants, ecosystems, and humans. Pollinators are responsible for assisting over 80% of the world’s flowering plants to reproduce—meaning most of our food is produced with the help of pollinators. The most widely known pollinator is the bee, but pollinators can include other animals (like bats and hummingbirds) …

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Do Your Native Seeds Need Fertilizer?

NRCS COMPLIANT CRP MIXES BY STATE

Native plants occur naturally in a particular region and have adapted to the climates and soil from these local habitats. By nature, these plants are accustomed to growing in even the most difficult circumstances and can take the nutrients they need directly from the soil. Their robust nature means native crops often do not have …

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Adding Wild Bergamot to Your CRP

Wild Bergamot | CRP

Monardo fistulosa, better known as wild bergamot or bee balm, is a wildflower belonging to the mint family. This perennial can be found throughout much of North America in thickets, clearings, and dry fields. Wild bergamot can easily be identified by its summer-blooming flowers that typically range from pink to lavender (though they can also be white). These flowers produce a strong fragrance (as well as a potent taste …

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The History of Humans and the Honeybee

The honeybee has always played an important role in the US economy, producing honey and wax, which in turn are used in countless other products. Today, however, the honeybee’s primary responsibility is pollination. Honeybees are responsible for 80% of crop pollination in the US, contributing $15 billion annually to the US farming industry.   Currently, there are …

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What Happens if Our Pollinators Die?

Last month, we discussed the reasons why so many of our major pollinators are dying. For honeybees, it’s because of Colony Collapse Disorder, which itself remains somewhat of a mystery. For bumbles, butterflies, and other pollinator species, however, it’s largely due to a loss of habitat, the use of harmful pesticides, changing climate conditions, and more.  With so many pollinators suffering, it’s important that we take …

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Why Are So Many Pollinators Dying?

Animal pollination is a critical part of our world’s economy. Thirty-five percent of our food crops and 75% of our flowering plants need the presence of pollinators to thrive. This includes most fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs, livestock forage, and oil crops. Pollinators contribute $24 billion to the economy in the US alone.   The trouble is many of our major pollinators are dying in large quantities.  …

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Celebrate Pollinator Week by Creating Pollinator Habitat

The 14th annual National Pollinator Week is taking place from June 22-28, 2020. This is a chance to show appreciation and raise awareness for the pollinating species in the US. Without the presence of pollinators like bees, butterflies, birds, and even moths, farmlands would suffer from smaller yields and lower quality crops.   Inadequate pollination can affect the size and also the flavor of food crops.  And so, it’s important …

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